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Singing in a Choir: My Rehabilitation after a Stroke

Many people say singing is easier than speaking. For me, this seems so. As my confidence has grown [from being a part of the Cantabrainers Choir], I have been allowed to make sounds by myself in Choir… Now I am allowed a whole verse—not perfect, but good enough to understand, and will perform on a stage—something I thought I would never do.
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An S-LP with Dysphagia

“I always believed that I would be able to take care of myself when in hospital, as long as I had my full cognitive and communicative abilities. What I was not prepared for was developing a neurological condition that had an unusual presentation.”
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Creating My Own Therapy Materials

“My job in Canada as a speech therapist with preschool children constantly inspired me with new projects. As I was constantly facing a lack of material to address the specific needs of my clients, I started to develop my own.”
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A Lot for a Two-Year-Old to Handle

“We hope that someday, funding and support will be given on a needs basis, not a diagnosis basis; and that access to therapies such as speech and occupational, will be more freely available.”
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Working as a Speech Pathologist in Vietnam

“Speech pathology in Vietnam might be at the starting line, but the country (without being overtly aware of it) has a dedicated collective of professionals that are keen for their country to have speech pathology services.”
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An 18-Year-Old with Aphasia: Sarah’s Story

[Through her own YouTube channel] Sarah has inspired others to create their own websites and videos to show how language can recover after a brain injury. There is no plateau—even if you’re not the same, you can improve. There is always hope, which is a good thing, because without hope there’s nothing.
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No Mountain too High for Stroke Survivor Gary

Having a massive stroke at the age of 35 left Gary George fighting for his life in an Ethiopian Hospital…[he] describes his despair in those first early weeks, feeling trapped inside his own body. But once the anger and bitterness subsided he began to believe he could achieve some level of normality again—if he had the right attitude.
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